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  • Staying Physically Active: How Much Exercise is Right for You? March 4, 2015
    by Adrienne Snavely Everyone knows that the key to keeping a healthy body is a combination of a healthy diet and regular physical activity. What is considered “regular” differs from person to person. The Dietary Guidelines for America (DGA) first …
  • Supreme Court to Hear New Obamacare Case This Week March 2, 2015
    Later this week, the Supreme Court will hear arguments in King v. Burwell, the results of which could affect the future of Obamacare. This case addresses if consumers who buy health insurance at HealthCare.gov are eligible to receive tax credits …
  • How to Fight and Prevent Sugar Cravings February 27, 2015
    The average American consumes about 16 teaspoons more sugar per day than what is recommended. Sugar causes the brain to release serotonin, creating a natural high, and the endorphins leave us wanting more. Kicking a sugar addiction can be tough, …
  • Hospital Closures Bring “New Day” in Healthcare February 25, 2015
    Hospitals are operating with fewer beds or closing, as patients seek more affordable medical care at clinics and outpatient surgery centers. A low occupancy rate makes for a high-priced facility, which is not competitive. These closures are due to the …
  • Do Your Part to Protect Your Heart – February Special February 23, 2015
    February is Heart month. Protect the health of your heart, preventing heart disease and stroke, with a simple blood test. Below are the February specials from DirectLabs. Lipid Profile – $19 (Regular Price $29, $98 Retail) Test includes: Cholesterol, Total …
  • The Various Dimensions of Mammogram Screening February 20, 2015
    by Adrienne Snavely Every year, over 200,000 women in the U.S. are diagnosed with breast cancer and about 40,000 will die from it. When breast cancer is detected early, it is easier to treat. Forty million mammograms are performed each …
  • Crashing the Free Market Party February 16, 2015
    by G. Keith Smith MD Riding in to rescue the victims of Obamacare and other government healthcare schemes are guess who? The legislators? The regulators? Don’t make me laugh. It is the growing group of healthcare free marketeers. The celebration …
  • Dark Chocolate is Good For You and Your Valentine February 13, 2015
    Dark chocolate is loaded with nutrients, one of the best sources of antioxidants, and can improve health and lower risk of heart disease. Dark chocolate is very nutritious. It contains a fair amount of soluble fiber and is full of …
  • The Fraser Institute: Education Spending in Canada February 12, 2015
    Despite a steady decline in student enrolment, spending on public schools in Canada has skyrocketed.Teachers’ unions and activists repeatedly claim that education spending is being cut and school budgets are in peril. That’s simply not true and ignores the reality …
  • Eye-Tracking Test Detects Early Alzheimer’s Disease February 11, 2015
    One in nine Americans over 65 has Alzheimer’s disease. There is no way to revive dead cells, but if detected early enough, the disease progression can be slowed with treatment. Spinal fluid analysis and PET scans can detect the approaching …
  • OMTEC 2014 – Emerging Trends in Orthopaedic Device Packaging February 11, 2015
    Laura Bix, Associate Professor, School of Packaging, Michigan State University discusses current and emerging trends in orthopaedic device packaging at OMTEC 2014.
  • Fee for Service Healthcare Just Makes Sense February 9, 2015
    Contrary to what the HHS has stated, the fee-for-service payment model has nothing to do with abuse or wasteful spending. This model has been the standard method of payment for a wide range of goods and services from the beginning …
  • A Healthy Heart at Any Age February 6, 2015
    Any age is a good age to take care of your heart. Smart choices now can pay off for the rest of your life. There are some simple steps to keep your heart healthy during each decade of life. All …
  • FRASER INSTITUTE 40th Anniversary 2014 February 5, 2015
    The Fraser Institute is an internationally-recognized research and education organization, ranked first among Canadian think tanks and in the top 20 globally. Our mission is to improve the quality of life for Canadians, their families and future generations by studying, …
  • Cut Your Costs by Just Not Paying February 4, 2015
    If patients all got healthy, medical costs would plummet. And if doctors weren’t paid for caring for patients who don’t get healthy, costs would also plummet. This seems to be the reasoning behind the Obama Administration’s ambitious plans for payment …
  • Measles – What You Need to Know February 2, 2015
    by Adrienne Snavely Over the last month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported 67 cases of measles traced to Disneyland, and the number continues to rise. This was a souvenir people didn’t plan for. For a disease that …
  • Free Markets are Destroyed by Congress, Not Created January 30, 2015
    By Jane M. Orient, M.D. When people clamor for Congress to pass a “free-market health plan,” they are forgetting two things: Congress only does laws, which restrict freedom. We need fewer laws, not more. And the free market is by …
  • Ralph Weber Talks MediCrats with FreedomWorks – Part 3 January 26, 2015
    MediBid is the free market answer to rising healthcare costs. Employer-sponsored plans, as well as self-insured individuals, make up most of MediBid’s customers. On MediBid, a patient makes a procedure request which gets sent out to physicians and facilities around …
  • Medical Debt Still a Problem for Those With Health Insurance January 23, 2015
    by Adrienne Snavely Medical debt can affect anyone of any age in any state in any income bracket. Medical debts account for more than half of debt collections on credit reports. One in three Americans struggle to pay medical bills, …
  • Q&A with Direct Pay Physicians January 22, 2015
    Direct pay physicians answer colleagues’ questions about third-party-free medical practice. From January 9, 2015, New Orleans AAPS workshop.

Staying Physically Active: How Much Exercise is Right for You?

by Adrienne Snavely

Everyone knows that the key to keeping a healthy body is a combination of a healthy diet and regular physical activity. What is considered “regular” differs from person to person. The Dietary Guidelines for America (DGA) first explained the importance of physical activity in 1990 and has reinforced this in every edition since then. Physically active people have improved growth and development and lower rates of chronic diseases.

In 2008, the Dept of Health and Human Services issued the first Physical Activity Guidelines (PAG) for Americans age 6 and older.

  • Children and adolescents should do 60 minutes or more physical activity every kidsportsday. Most of the minutes should be moderate to vigorous intensity aerobic physical activity. The other minutes should include muscle and bone strengthening activities. Encourage young people to participate in activities that are age-appropriate, enjoyable, and that offer variety.
  • Adults age 18 to 64 should avoid inactivity, and some is better than none. Adults should do at 150-300 minutes a week of moderate intensity or 75-150 minutes of vigorous intensity in periods of at least 10 minutes each. Adults should also do muscle-strengthening activities two or more days a week.
  • hormonemenOlder adults over age 65 should be as physically active as their abilities and conditions allow. They should do exercises that maintain or improve balance to prevent falls. Those with chronic conditions should understand if and how their conditions will affect their ability to safely do regular physical activity.

Despite the best efforts to encourage regular physical activity, most of the U.S. population does not meet the PAG recommendations. In the National Health Interview Survey, fewer than 21% of adults met the minimum recommendations, fewer women than men and fewer minorities than the white populations. Also only 27% of adolescents, fewer girls than boys, met the recommendations. Over the past six years, data shows a minimal, but positive trend.

treadmillsPhysically active children and adolescents have higher levels of cardiorespiratory endurance and muscular strength. Compared to less active or sedentary adults, being physically active resulted in cardio and muscular fitness, healthier body weight/composition, enhanced bone health, and lower risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. High-intensity muscle-strengthening activity enhances skeletal muscle mass, strength, and power. Physical activity reduces the risk of depression and cognitive decline in adults and older adults.

To reduce the risk of injuries during physical activity:
walking

  • Understand the risks but be confident it is safe
  • Do types of activity appropriate for your current fitness level and health goals
  • Increase activity level over time
  • Use appropriate gear and sports equipment
  • People with chronic conditions should consult their physician about what kind of activity is appropriate for them.

http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015-scientific-report/12-chapter-7/

Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. “Part D. Chapter 7: Physical Activity.” Advisory Report of 2015. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 2015. Web. 3 Mar 2015.

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Posted in Health (taking care of yourself) Tagged , , , , , , , |

Supreme Court to Hear New Obamacare Case This Week

healthcare-govLater this week, the Supreme Court will hear arguments in King v. Burwell, the results of which could affect the future of Obamacare. This case addresses if consumers who buy health insurance at HealthCare.gov are eligible to receive tax credits under the law. Obamacare authorizes subsidies for those who purchase insurance through state exchanges, and only 14 states are operating their own exchanges. The expense of creating an exchange is not worth the trouble when the end result is the same as if buying at the federal website. Since so many states decided not to run their own exchanges, the IRS extended subsidies to those who purchase online, which violates the legislation’s plain language. “What the statute says is what matters,” says Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah. He is coming up with a short-term solution to help the people who will be hurt by losing their subsidies. Nearly 5.5 million Americans will receive subsidies this year, so the number of uninsured could increase if the Supreme Court rules against the Obama administration. Sen. Hatch wants to remove the federal government from the business of medicine and let patients be in charge of their health care decisions.

http://dailysignal.com/2015/02/23/supreme-court-prepares-hear-new-obamacare-case-one-senator-preparing-plan-b/

Quinn, Melissa. “As Supreme Court Prepares to Hear New Obamacare Case, One Senator Is Preparing a Plan B.” Health Care News. The Daily Signal, 23 Feb 2015. Web. 1 Mar 2015.

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Posted in Health Care Reform Tagged , , , , , , , |

How to Fight and Prevent Sugar Cravings

The average American consumes about 16 teaspoons more sugar per day than what is recommended. Sugar causes the brain to release serotonin, creating a natural high, and the endorphins leave us wanting more. Kicking a sugar addiction can be tough, but cravings can be curbed and eventually prevented with the following tips.

Lifestyle
Limit caffeine. Caffeine increases blood glucose by 24%, leaving your body craving sweetness afterward.
Stay hydrated. The body needs water for blood to flow at the right pressure and maintains a feeling of fullness.
Exercise and sleep better. Exercise oxygenates the body and increases endorphins, the same great feeling created by sugar and sweetness. Plenty of sleep and exercising your body reduces tension, boosts energy, and lessens your need for a sugar rush.

Diet
Avoid foods labeled “fat free” or “low fat”. These contain more sugar than their full fat counterparts.
Reduce or eliminate processed foods. There is a great amount of sugar in processed food, even items such as “healthy” wheat crackers. Check the sugar content on labels before purchasing. Choose fiber-rich whole foods over refined treats.
Eat plenty of protein. Protein deficiency can lead to sugar cravings as body searches for an energy source. Make sure to get protein in every meal so body has fuel.
Cook with sweet spices. Spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg, and clove naturally sweeten food reducing cravings.
Eat fruits and sweet vegetables. Go ahead and eat something sweet, but make sure it is healthy. Sweet potatoes, podded peas, beets, and bell peppers can provide a quick energy boost when needed.
Use natural sweeteners. Sweeteners like brown rice syrup, palm sugar, and stevia will meet your craving for sweetness without too many calories. Artificial sweeteners do not curb cravings any less than real sugar.

Health
Check your mineral levels. Magnesium deficiency can lead to intense sugar cravings, especially for chocolate. Recommended intake is 400mg per day. Good sources of magnesium include nuts, beans, spinach, and whole grains. Zinc deficiency can also cause cravings.
Intestinal imbalances can cause sugar cravings, so take a probiotic supplement to fill the gut with healthy bacteria.
L-glutamine supplements. This amino acid glutamine can reduce and even eliminate sugar cravings by leveling out blood sugar. Stress causes your body to become deficient in this nutrient and reach for sweet comfort foods. Take 100-500mg three times a day
If your Vitamin D is low, you may feel hungry all the time.
Make sure you are getting plenty of omega-3 fatty acids, which help regulate brain function.
Find sweetness in life. Distract yourself until the sugar craving passes, since the more you resist, the quicker your cravings will disappear.

http://www.livescience.com/36005-fighting-sugar-cravings-diet-tips.html

Enos CN, Deborah. “8 Tips for Fighting Sugar Cravings.” Health. LiveScience, 30 Nov 2011. Web. 26 Feb 2015.

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/09/11/ways-to-eliminate-sugar-cravings/

Banks, Jacqueline Silvestri. “9 ways to eliminate sugar cravings.” Nutrition. Fox News, 11 Sep 2013. Web. 26 Feb 2015.

http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/supplements-stop-sugar-cravings-10809.html

Martinac, Paula. “Supplements to Stop Sugar Cravings.” Healthy Eating. SFGate. Web. 26 Feb 2015.

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Posted in Health (taking care of yourself) Tagged , , , , , , |

Hospital Closures Bring “New Day” in Healthcare

Hospitals are operating with fewer beds or closing, as patients seek more affordable surgokmedical care at clinics and outpatient surgery centers. A low occupancy rate makes for a high-priced facility, which is not competitive. These closures are due to the boom in high deductible insurance policies, better technology, and shrinking reimbursement rates. Hospital admissions and lengths of stay have been falling for years, shifting to outpatient care. Over 27 hospitals closed last year due to the flat or declining volume for inpatient care. Small, independent hospitals are most vulnerable to financial stress, and about half of the hospitals that closed last year had an average of 60 beds. Hospitals are trying to generate income from their vacant space, signing leases to hospice providers or hotel operators. The age of hospital buildings is rising and construction has dropped sharply. Funding is now moving toward surgery centers, hiring new primary care physicians, and improving technology. Patients and insurers are looking for new ways to get better care at lower costs. Patients with high-deductible insurance policies make up 20% of all employer-provided health plans, and they are shopping around to save money on their medical care. MediBid partners patients looking for affordable health care with clinics, surgery centers, and hospitals around the country and the globe.

http://www.modernhealthcare.com/article/20150221/MAGAZINE/302219988/hospitals-face-closures-as-a-new-day-in-healthcare-dawns

Evans, Melanie. “Hospitals face closures as ‘a new day in healthcare’ dawns.” Hospitals. Modern Healthcare, 21 Feb 2015. Web. 24 Feb 2015.

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Posted in Cost of Health Care Tagged , , , , , , , |

Do Your Part to Protect Your Heart – February Special

February is Heart month. Protect the health of your heart, preventing heart disease and stroke, with a simple blood test. Below are the February specials from DirectLabs.

hearthealthorder nowLipid Profile$19 (Regular Price $29, $98 Retail)

Test includes:

Cholesterol, Total
HDL (good) Cholesterol
LDL (bad) Cholesterol
Risk Ratio (good to total)
Triglycerides

order nowCardioPlus$29 (Regular Price $45, $292 Retail)

Test includes:
Lipids: This is a group of simple blood tests that reveal important information about the types, amount and distribution of the various types of fats (lipids) in the bloodstream. Includes Total Cholesterol, HDL (good) Cholesterol, vLDL (very low density LDL, LDL (bad) Cholesterol, Risk Ratio (good to total), and Triglycerides.
Fluids and Electrolytes: Includes Chloride, Potassium and Sodium
Liver: Includes Albumin, Alkaline Phosphatase, Alanine Transaminase (ALT or SGPT), Aspartate Transaminase (AST or SGOT), Total Protein, LDH, Total Globulin, Albumin/Globulin Ratio, and GGT
Kidney: Includes Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN), Creatinine, BUN/Creatinine Ratio, eGFR, and Uric Acid
Glucose
Mineral and Bone: Total Iron, Calcium, and Phosphorus

order nowNMR$89 (Regular Price $127, $167 Retail)

Test includes:
The NMR LipoProfile® test is an advanced cardiovascular diagnostic test that uses nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to measure the actual number of atherogenic LDL particles that build up in the arteries causing heart disease. This test includes: Insulin resistance calculation, lipoprotein particle number, lipoprotein subfractions, and a standard lipid panel (total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides).

order nowCardioPlus Advantage$99 (Regular Price $149, $549 Retail)

Test includes:
Lipids: This is a group of simple blood tests that reveal important information about the types, amount and distribution of the various types of fats (lipids) in the bloodstream. Includes Total Cholesterol, HDL (good) Cholesterol, vLDL (very low density LDL), LDL (bad) Cholesterol, Risk Ratio (good to total), and Triglycerides.
Fluids and Electrolytes: Includes Chloride, Potassium, and Sodium.
Liver: Includes Albumin, Alkaline Phosphatase, Alanine Transaminase (ALT or SGPT), Aspartate Transaminase (AST or SGOT), Total Protein, LDH, Total Globulin, Albumin/Globulin Ratio, and GGT.
Kidney: Includes Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN), Creatinine, BUN/Creatinine Ratio, eGFR, and Uric Acid.
Cardio C-Reactive Protein, highly sensitive (CRP,hs): A high or increasing amount of CRP in your blood suggests that you have an acute infection or inflammation. Because CRP increases in cases of inflammation, the test is ordered when acute inflammation is a risk (such as from an infection after surgery) or suspected based on patient symptoms. It is also ordered to help diagnose conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. The blood tests may be repeated often to learn whether treatment of an inflammatory disease is effective (CRP levels drop as inflammation subsides). C-Reactive protein is a substance in the blood that indicates the presence of inflammation and could warn of a heart attack in advance. Elevated amounts of the protein in men may triple their risk for heart attack and double their risk for stroke, whereas elevated amounts in women can increase their heart attack risk up to seven times. Cardio (also specific or high sensitivity) C-Reactive Protein is a marker of inflammation to the blood vessels and a strong predictor of risk for future myocardial infarctions.
Homocysteine: The amino acid, Homocysteine, plays a role in destroying the lining of your artery walls, promoting the formation of blood clots, and also accelerates the buildup of scar tissue. High levels may increase the chance of heart disease and stroke, especially if you have other risk factors such as diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, smoking, or family history. Critical to your metabolism, thyroid function affects your energy level, heart rate, weight control, plus more.

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The Various Dimensions of Mammogram Screening

by Adrienne Snavely

Every year, over 200,000 women in the U.S. are diagnosed with breast cancer and about 40,000 will die from it. When breast cancer is detected early, it is easier to treat. Forty million mammograms are performed each year. Which type of test should you opt for?

mammogram2D and film mammography are equivalent for most women, one is not more accurate than the other. Digital equipment can cost four times that of film-based equipment. In conventional mammograms, the breast is compressed between two plates and images are taken from two angles. 2D digital images may be more accurate for women younger than 50 who are pre- or peri-menopausal with dense breasts. Both types of 2D mammograms are covered by most health insurance.

3D mammograms are offered in 48 states and over 50 countries, and have been in use since 2011 in the U.S. The 3D scanner moves in an arc over the breasts, taking images from various angles. When used along with standard 2D digital screening, 3D mammography increased cancer detection rates by more than 40%. In 2013, the FDA decided that low-dose 3D digital mammography is accurate enough to be used by itself. 3D mammograms mammogram2are better at detecting invasive tumors and avoiding false alarms. Finding abnormalities may be easier with the 3D tests. Abnormalities detected may not be dangerous, resulting in unnecessary anxiety, testing, and treatment. By using 3D screening, there was a 15% decrease in callbacks – returning for more imaging due to suspicious findings. The 3D test takes a few seconds longer than 2D, but the amount of radiation exposure is about the same for women with small or medium breasts. Women with larger breasts may need additional images, thus more radiation exposure. 3D screenings have identified cancer 4-5% more often than film or 2D digital mammograms. 3D mammography caught 5.4 cancers out of 1,000 women screened vs. 4.2 per 1,000 in the year before the 3D technology was available. 3D mammograms are more expensive than standard film or 2D ones, and insurers don’t cover them yet. Women would have to pay the difference, about $50 to $100 – a small price to pay for better healthcare and peace of mind.

http://www.webmd.com/breast-cancer/news/20140624/3d-mammograms-may-improve-breast-cancer-screening

Norton, Amy. “3D Mammograms May Improve Breast Cancer Screening.” Breast Cancer News. WebMD, 24 Jun 2014. Web. 19 Feb 2015.

http://www.stopcancerfund.org/p-breast-cancer/is-digital-mammography-better/

Dudley PhD, Susan and Kennedy PhD, Caitlin. “Should I “Upgrade” to Digital or 3D? A Mammography Guide.” Breast Cancer. Cancer Prevention and Treatment Fund, Nov 2013. Web. 19 Feb 2015.

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Crashing the Free Market Party

by G. Keith Smith MD

To_the_rescueRiding in to rescue the victims of Obamacare and other government healthcare schemes are guess who? The legislators? The regulators? Don’t make me laugh. It is the growing group of healthcare free marketeers. The celebration following the receipt of an Obamacare insurance card or qualifying for Medicaid is short-lived once patients realize that “coverage doesn’t mean care,” as my friend Dr. Jane Orient has famously said.

Leading the way on the primary care front are Atlas MD (http://atlas.md/wichita/), Epiphany Health (http://www.epiphanyhealth.net/) and Medlion (http://www.medlion.com/). I apologize if I have left anyone out and this is likely as more are entering this space even as I write this. These are all primary care subscription programs where a patient or family pays a small amount each month to cover their primary care needs. When I say small, I mean less than what it costs to administer Medicaid primary care needs, or as my friend, Dr. Lee Gross (founder of Epiphany) has said, “…less than a cell phone bill each month.”

Take a look at the above websites for a glimpse at what the subscription fee includes.  Keep in mind also that self-funded businesses are increasingly intrigued with this concept of primary care delivery for what it doesn’t provide:  entrance and exposure to the overpriced world of hospital employed physicians and specialists and care at their bosses’ establishments.

What is the reaction of the healthcare industry to the efficient, fairly priced and high quality solution to the delivery of primary care? Bribed bureaucrats and legislators as a favor to their corporate pals want to regulate them out of business, treating them as “insurance.” Several states (kudos to them) have passed laws specifically designating Direct Primary Care (DPC) practices as immune to such destructive regulatory attempts. The absence of such crony-limiting laws invites the very orgy of bribery and corruption you would suspect. While it is sad it is not surprising that we have for some time been in a place where any oasis of liberty requires a statute protecting it from the predatory state.

The growth of the DPC practices and industry is key to the continued delivery of health care in this country, particularly as the effects of federal intervention wreck havoc on patients’ ability to afford basic care. More basic healthcare needs are declared ineligible for payment every week while at the same time insurance deductibles and premiums skyrocket. DPC practices are not only the life raft, they are the key to bringing healthcare costs under control, particularly for those requiring care for conditions such as diabetes and vascular disease (to list just two examples) that require chronic and continuous disease management.

As the federal government and their crony accomplices attempt to make off with an even greater percentage of GDP for healthcare, I believe it is important to understand, recognize and support the tenacious underdogs (like the DPC practices) standing in stark defiance. Here is the Journal Record article by Oklahoma Council of Public Affairs President Michael Carnuccio appealing to the power brokers in the state house to ensure that these DPC practices remain unmolested.

http://surgerycenterofoklahoma.tumblr.com/post/107936160307/new-healthcare-crony-attempt-to-crash-the-free

Smith MD, G. Keith. “New Healthcare Crony Attempt to Crash the Free Market Party.” Surgery Center of Oklahoma, Jan 2015. Web. 15 Feb 2015.

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Posted in Free market medicine Tagged , , , , , , , |

Dark Chocolate is Good For You and Your Valentine

chocolate-heartDark chocolate is loaded with nutrients, one of the best sources of antioxidants, and can improve health and lower risk of heart disease.

Dark chocolate is very nutritious. It contains a fair amount of soluble fiber and is full of minerals. The fatty acids in cocoa are excellent, mostly saturated and monounsaturated fats. It also contains stimulants like caffeine, but such a small amount that it will not keep you awake at night.

Dark chocolate is a great source of antioxidants. Raw, unprocessed cocoa beans have among the highest antioxidant activity in foods. Cocoa contains more antioxidants than fruits such as blueberries and Acai berries.

Dark chocolate improves blood flow and lowers blood pressure. The flavanols in dark chocolate stimulate the lining of the arteries to produce nitric oxide, which relaxes the arteries – thus lowering resistance to blood flow resulting in lower blood pressure.

Dark chocolate raises HDL and protects LDL from oxidation. Cocoa powder significantly decreased oxidized LDL and increased HDL in a trial of men with elevated cholesterol. It also reduces insulin resistance, which is a risk factor for heart disease and diabetes.

Dark chocolate lowers risk of cardiovascular disease. Being highly protective against LDL darkchocolate1oxidation, there should be much less cholesterol to build up in the arteries, lowering the risk of long term heart disease. Studies show a drastic improvement in elderly men, reducing the risk of death by heart disease by 50% over 15 years. Eating chocolate two or more times per week also lowers plaque calcification in the arteries by more than 30%.

Dark chocolate protects your skin from the sun. The flavonols protect against sun damage by improving blood flow to the skin and increasing skin density and hydration.

Dark chocolate improves brain function. Consuming high-flavanol cocoa for five days showed improved blood flow to the brain. Cocoa also improves cognitive function in the elderly with mental impairment.

superchocolateDark chocolate has numerous health benefits. Remember that it is still full of sugar and calories, so eat it in moderation – a square or two after dinner. Be sure to choose quality chocolate with 70% cocoa content or higher. The darker the chocolate, the less sugar it will contain.

 

http://authoritynutrition.com/7-health-benefits-dark-chocolate/

Gunnars, Kris. “7 Proven Health Benefits of Dark Chocolate (No. 5 is Best).” AuthorityNutrition, Jun 2013. Web. 12 Feb 2015.

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Posted in Health (taking care of yourself) Tagged , , , , , , , |

The Fraser Institute: Education Spending in Canada

Despite a steady decline in student enrolment, spending on public schools in Canada has skyrocketed.
Teachers’ unions and activists repeatedly Continue reading

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Posted in Canadian Healthcare, Economics, Medibid Television

Eye-Tracking Test Detects Early Alzheimer’s Disease

One in nine Americans over 65 has Alzheimer’s disease. There is no way to revive dead cells, but if detected early enough, the disease progression can be slowed with treatment. Spinal fluid analysis and PET scans can detect the approaching disease, but are painful and expensive. Company Neurotrack has developed a computerized visual screening test, eyewhich requires no language or motor skills, where a camera tracks eye movements while showing images on a monitor. Alzheimer’s patients have a damaged hippocampus and will not show a preference for one image in a pair. This five minute Web-based test can predict Alzheimer’s development three years in advance. This visual screening, along with blood tests, retinal scans, and cognitive tests, are simple ways to detect presymptomatic Alzheimer’s. Doctors would likely use several of these methods to assess the progression of the disease in a patient.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/eye-tracking-test-enters-into-the-running-for-an-alzheimer-s-screen/

Landhuis, Esther. “Eye-Tracking Test Enters into the Running for an Alzheimer’s Screen.” Health. Scientific American, 20 Jan 2015. Web. 10 Feb 2015.

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Posted in Health Care Innovation Tagged , , , , , , , |
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