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  • Health Insurance Exchanges Waste Taxpayer Money September 29, 2014
    Obamacare may surpass Cash for Clunkers to become the prime example of federal taxpayer resource mismanagement. For every dollar in premiums for exchange coverage, taxpayers paid 94 cents in subsidies to either enroll people or encourage them to do so. …
  • Mesothelioma: An avoidable cancer? September 26, 2014
    by Sue Redmond Did you know? Mesothelioma is an aggressive cancer that attacks the lining of the body cavity called the mesothelium (80% of which occur within the lining of the lungs). The only known cause to mesothelioma is exposure …
  • Government Healthcare is Breech of Contract September 24, 2014
    by G. Keith Smith, MD One of the smartest people I have ever met is a property and contracts lawyer, someone from whom I have gleaned countless and valuable insights over the years.  He has advised me, among other things, …
  • Dr. Alieta Eck Campaign Update September 24, 2014
    Dr. Eck http://EckForCongress.com speaks to colleagues at AAPS 71st annual meeting on September 5, 2014.
  • Is There A Provider In The House? September 22, 2014
    by Marilyn Singleton, MD, JD Physicians have a proud heritage. We can boast Dr. Benjamin Rush, a founding father, signer of the Declaration of Independence, Surgeon General of the Continental Army, and opponent of slavery. And Dr. James Derham, born …
  • From EBM to Guidelines September 20, 2014
    Richard Amerling, MD presents at the 71st Annual Meeting of the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons, September 5, 2014.
  • Flaw In Federal Software Lets Employers Offer Plans Without Hospital Benefits September 19, 2014
    A flaw in the federal calculator for certifying that insurance meets the health law’s toughest standard is leading dozens of large employers to offer plans that lack basic benefits such as hospitalization coverage, according to brokers and consultants. The calculator …
  • Ralph Weber Talks About Cost Shifting – Video September 17, 2014
    How do hospitals come up with their prices? Medicare patients cause them to lose money. They have to make up the difference by charging the self-insured more. Non-profit hospitals keep beds vacant or build other facilities so as not to …
  • Here’s The Thing #4 Cost Shifting HD September 17, 2014
  • The Commoditization of Medicine September 17, 2014
    Parvez Dara, MD, FACP, MBA, author of http://jedismedicine.blogspot.com/, speaks at the AAPS 71st Annual Meeting in Charleston, SC.
  • The Progressive Train Wreck: From Medicare to HillaryCare to ObamaCare September 15, 2014
    Jane M Orient, MD presents at the AAPS 71st annual meeting, September 5, 2014, Charleston, SC.
  • Varying Prices for Lab Tests are Absurd September 15, 2014
    by Adrienne Snavely The health needs of a community vary by market. If you cannot find what you need or afford it, you should have the opportunity and information to go elsewhere without being penalized. A patient in Chicago went …
  • The Future Of Medicare September 14, 2014
    Lawrence R. Huntoon, MD, PhD presents at the 71st Annual Meeting of the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons, September 6, 2014, Charleston, South Carolina.
  • Unethical ABMS behaviors and the MOC Scam: How It Will Be Used to Control Medical Practice September 13, 2014
    Paul Kempen, MD, PhD presenting at 71st annual meeting of AAPS, September 6, 2014, Charleston, SC.
  • How is that low fat diet working out for you? September 12, 2014
    by Sue Redmond First, let’s ask where did the idea for the low diet come from? In the late 50’s and early 60’s the AMA worked on a theory and published a report that a low fat diet could help …
  • EHR: Remote Control – Craig M. Wax, D.O. September 12, 2014
    Dr. Wax of http://ip4pi.wordpress.com examines how government-controlled electronic health records undermine quality medical care and patient privacy. Presentation at 71st Annual AAPS Meeting Sept. 4-6, 2014.
  • Evidence-Based Medicine as Junk Science — Twila Brase RN September 11, 2014
    Twila Brase, President of http://CCHFreedom.org outlines how so-called evidence-based medicine (EBM) encourages one-size-fits-all healthcare, is a tool for increased control by insurance companies and the government, and is detrimental to individualized patient care.
  • What ObamaCare Means for Patients September 11, 2014
    Kris Held, MD addresses the 71st Annual Meeting of the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons, September 4, 2014 in Charleston, SC.
  • Private Health Care is Individualized Care, Not Public Health — Richard Amerling, MD September 10, 2014
    AAPS President-Elect Richard Amerling, MD opens the 71st Annual Meeting, Sept. 4, 2014, Charleston, SC.
  • Come Together – The Kidney Stones September 10, 2014

Health Insurance Exchanges Waste Taxpayer Money

dollarsignObamacare may surpass Cash for Clunkers to become the prime example of federal taxpayer resource mismanagement. For every dollar in premiums for exchange coverage, taxpayers paid 94 cents in subsidies to either enroll people or encourage them to do so. Had federal dollars used to set up exchanges been incorporated into premiums instead of having taxpayers front the difference, premiums would have more than doubled. Costs were nearly $1000 lower per enrollee in Republican-controlled states compared to Democrat. Administrative costs for the exchanges were nearly 3 times as large in Democrat states(27 cents) as Republican(10 cents). Many states, such as Oregon and Massachusetts, are getting rid of their exchanges already. Nevada and Maryland are likely to shut theirs down as well.  Minnesota and Hawaii are struggling with exchange problems. Much of the money for state-run exchanges has not been well spent. As Milton Friedman warned us years ago: “Very few people spend other people’s money as carefully as they spend their own.” The reduction of administrative expenses is what allows doctors and medical facilities on MediBid to offer exceptional pricing on medical care.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/theapothecary/2014/05/12/obamacare-exchanges-squander-taxpayer-dollars-by-the-boatload/

Conover, Chris. “Obamacare Exchanges Squander Taxpayer Dollars By The Boatload.” Opinion. Forbes, 12 May 2014. Web. 28 Sep 2014.

http://www.ncpa.org/sub/dpd/index.php?Article_ID=24443&utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=DPD

NCPA Staff. “Waste of Taxpayer Dollars in Exchanges.” Daily Policy Digest. National Center for Policy Analysis, 21 May 2014. Web. 28 Sep 2014.

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Mesothelioma: An avoidable cancer?

by Sue Redmond

Did you know?

epithelialMesothelioma is an aggressive cancer that attacks the lining of the body cavity called the mesothelium (80% of which occur within the lining of the lungs).

The only known cause to mesothelioma is exposure to asbestos.

Asbestos is a natural mineral classified as a carcinogen because of its association with mesothelioma.

Even though the EPA banned most asbestos containing products, the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals overturned the regulation. As a result only a few of these products remain banned.

Asbestos still remains the number one cause of occupational cancer in the United States.

To this day, asbestos is still found in many buildings from schools to industrial buildings.

Mesothelioma is most commonly diagnosed in men between the ages of 50 and 70 but, it’s on rise in younger women who have experienced second hand exposure from parents or spouses who worked closely with asbestos.

2500 to 3000 cases of mesothelioma are diagnosed each year and on average they are given 10 months to live.

I recently had contact with and read about an amazing, courageous mother, wife and survivor of mesothelioma, Heather Von St. James. She was diagnosed with the cancer when her daughter was just 3 months old and given 15 months to live. Her story of finding Dr. David Sugarbaker at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and her struggle through recovering is inspirational. But, I think the most wonderful part is seeing her passion and purpose in life coming through her blog and all that she does to get the word out about mesothelioma and asbestos.

Mesothelioma Awareness Day is September 26. You can find out more about mesothelioma at www.mesothelioma.com and read and share Heather’s story at www.mesothelioma.com/heather.

www.Mesothelioma.com

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Posted in Health (taking care of yourself) Tagged , , , , , , |

Government Healthcare is Breech of Contract

by G. Keith Smith, MD

ContractOne of the smartest people I have ever met is a property and contracts lawyer, someone from whom I have gleaned countless and valuable insights over the years.  He has advised me, among other things, to lead a “haggle-free” business life, where bids solicited from vendors are a “one chance” occurrence.  There are no counter offers allowed.  Over the years, this has ensured a good price and a mutually beneficial arrangement all at once at our surgery center.

He has also taught me what a contract breech looks like and how to think through the extent of damages.  While I do not pretend to understand the tiniest fraction of his trade, I am confident that what I have learned from him has kept me out of hot water many times, particularly relating to business activities at the surgery center.

“People love to sue insurance companies because many times they deserve it,” he told me once.  Paying insurance premiums to a company offering homeowner’s insurance, for instance, with the understanding that weather damage would be “covered” represents a contract.  Any failure to make good on this “promise” by the insurance company exposes them to accusations of contract breech and fraud.  Collecting premiums and paying no claims is always a moneymaker, until this fraud is exposed.  Health insurance companies and many other types of insurance companies actively engage in practices that minimize or refuse payment of claims, bound only by what they feel they can likely get away with.  I am convinced that this is one reason insurance companies change their names frequently, this practice allowing them to scam the same population, masked by their new name.

What do you do if you live in a country with “single payer” health insurance and realize that you have been scammed, paying premiums (taxes) for many years, only to find out that you have little or no benefit?  You thought you were “covered” for various procedures or treatments only to find out that the treatment for your cancer was essentially in “layaway.”  You can’t sue for damages.  There is no recourse.  There is nowhere to turn, other than to leave the country to purchase healthcare elsewhere.  I am not sure there could be a better argument against single payer than an utter lack of recourse.

The lack of market competition and the recourse market failure represents, explains the failure of health care delivery in all socialized systems, whether in Canada or the VA system here, or the new Obamacare silliness.  Canadians have to buy health insurance, basically by paying taxes earmarked for the small amount of health care placed in layaway on their behalf.  People in the U.S. now must buy “insurance” or pay a penalty.  Worse, employers must provide insurance to their employees or pay a penalty.  What’s the difference?  The “purchases” in single payer countries and those in the U.S. now both occur at gunpoint, both mandated payments to those in power or connected to power.

Before you lay the blame for Obamacare on all of the stupid people in Washington, consider for a moment, Rothbard’s historical method.  The brilliant “Austrian” economist began every investigation of historical events with “cui bono,” or “who benefits.”  In short, he identified the beneficiaries of a law or government intrusion and assumed the worst of them, rarely if ever mistaken in his provocative conclusions.

Similarly, I maintain that to truly understand the purpose of Obamacare one must, I believe, start with the end result, that is, lots of very identifiable people and businesses getting rich because of this “law.” In the private sector, a scam like Obamacare would of course be considered criminal, at least a breech of contract.

The victims of single payer healthcare, VA healthcare and increasingly, Obamacare, are learning these lessons in the hardest ways imaginable.  The most difficult task it seems is to come to believe that the gang in D.C. knows exactly what they are doing and doesn’t care about broken promises or lives.

At the Surgery Center of Oklahoma we plan to continue trumpeting the power and the beauty of the market at work in health care, hoping that our facility’s success and wonderful patient success stories will more quickly bring an end to the idea that the provision of health care should be entrusted to the corrupt state.

http://surgerycenterofoklahoma.tumblr.com/post/91191968487/government-healthcare-as-a-contract-breech

Smith MD, G. Keith. “Government Healthcare as a Contract Breech.” Surgery Center of Oklahoma Blog, July 2014. Web. 23 Sep 2014.

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Dr. Alieta Eck Campaign Update

Dr. Eck http://EckForCongress.com speaks to colleagues at AAPS 71st annual meeting on September 5, 2014.

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Posted in Medibid Television, Tax Increases

Is There A Provider In The House?

by Marilyn Singleton, MD, JD

singletonPhysicians have a proud heritage. We can boast Dr. Benjamin Rush, a founding father, signer of the Declaration of Independence, Surgeon General of the Continental Army, and opponent of slavery. And Dr. James Derham, born a slave in 1762, who grew a successful practice that included freeman and slaves.

We have modern-day sources of pride in Dr. Sheik Humarr Khan, a world expert in the care of viral hemorrhagic fevers, Dr. Abrahim Borbor, and Dr. Sahr Rogers. All three died while fighting to save the lives of patients with Ebola Virus Disease.

Groups of physicians provide charity care at clinics across the country such as Volunteers in Medicine (VIM), “a national solution to America’s uninsured, guiding the development of a free clinic network one community at a time.” The San Francisco’s Clinic by the Bay, staffed by 125 volunteers, is fully privately financed and accepts no insurance or government funding.

Charity clinics across the country like Zarephath Health Center in New Jersey mirror the VIM concept of neighbors caring for neighbors. And many private practice physicians are dedicated to giving health care to everyone that shows up at their doors without government support.

The vast majority of physicians love “doctoring” but resent being progressively devalued by the “system.” They entered medicine to help people, not to be scapegoated. To bolster her socialistic health care reform, Hillary Clinton tried to paint doctors as greedy pigs. The newly released 1993 White House memos confirmed she was advised to “address as much as possible” physicians’ “misconceptions about managed care” and their “‘right’ to be overcompensated.”

True, most full-time physicians are compensated for their 60-plus hour work-weeks, including weekends, nights, and holidays. But a study using 2012 salary data from the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) revealed that the total U.S. physicians’ salaries accounted for only 8.6 percent of the nation’s total healthcare costs. Only Sweden, at 8.5 percent, directed less money to physicians, with Germany the highest at 15 percent. Clearly, there are larger systemic factors making U.S. health care the costliest of western industrialized nations.

California is hatching a new way to erode trust between patients and their doctors. A ballot initiative with the deceptive and sensationalistic title, “Drug And Alcohol Testing Of Doctors. Medical Negligence Lawsuits” looms. The implication is that drug-fueled doctors are committing malpractice. Behind the curtain are the plaintiffs’ attorneys seeking to raise the current cap on “pain and suffering” damages in medical malpractice cases. (All other types of damages are currently unlimited.)

The proponents insist physician drug testing is a patient safety issue. Then the initiative should mandate testing of nurses who have direct access to drugs and other primary care providers (PCPs), such as physician assistants, nurse practitioners, or California’s newest PCP, pharmacists. Let’s not forget optometrists, whom the state legislature is considering labeling as PCPs. Curiously, physicians are the initiative’s lone target.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has concocted an unappetizing alphabet soup of e-Rx (electronic prescribing), EHR (electronic health record), PQRS (Physicians Quality Reporting System), VBP (value-based purchasing), and VBM (value-based modifier) directed at EPs (eligible professionals). If they don’t eat their vegetables, physicians face penalties of up to 8 percent payment reductions by 2019 for choosing to spend their precious time with patients rather than with megabytes of paperwork with no proven value.

These rules lead medical interns to spend more than 40 percent of their time glued to a computer and only 12 percent of their time examining and talking with patients.

The Mayo Clinic’s Patients’ Perspectives on Ideal Physician Behaviors revealed that doctors should be thorough, confident, humane, personal, forthright, respectful, and empathetic. None of these attributes emanate from a computer screen full of metrics and centralized standards.

The patient-physician relationship is the most effective part of doctoring. Being the “old-fashioned” doctor does not mean ignoring scientific advances. It means seeing the patient as far more than a condition in an algorithm or a pre-authorization form.

Physicians must reconnect with the reason they became doctors and declare that they are not tools of insurance companies or the government. Patients need to tell their doctors and politicians that they are individuals, and deserve to be treated that way.

Please feel free to email me if you hear a flight attendant announce, “We have an emergency; is there a provider on board?”

Marilyn M. Singleton, MD, JD is a board-certified anesthesiologist and Association of American Physicians and Surgeons (AAPS) member. Despite being told, “they don’t take Negroes at Stanford”, she graduated from Stanford and earned her MD at UCSF Medical School. Dr. Singleton completed 2 years of Surgery residency at UCSF, then her Anesthesia residency at Harvard’s Beth Israel Hospital. She was an instructor, then Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland before returning to California for private practice. While still working in the operating room, she attended UC Berkeley Law School, focusing on constitutional law and administrative law. She interned at the National Health Law Project and practiced insurance and health law. She teaches classes in the recognition of elder abuse and constitutional law for non-lawyers. Dr. Singleton recently returned from El Salvador where she conducted make-shift medical clinics in two rural villages.

http://www.aapsonline.org/index.php/site/article/is_there_a_provider_in_the_house/

Singleton MD JD, Marilyn. “Is There A Provider In The House?” Association of American Physicians and Surgeons, 15 Sep 2014. Web. 21 Sep 2014.

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From EBM to Guidelines

Richard Amerling, MD presents at the 71st Annual Meeting of the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons, September 5, 2014.

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Posted in Medibid Television, Tax Increases

Flaw In Federal Software Lets Employers Offer Plans Without Hospital Benefits

A flaw in the federal calculator for certifying that insurance meets the health law’s toughest standard is leading dozens of large employers to offer plans that lack basic benefits such as hospitalization coverage, according to brokers and consultants.

obamacare calculatorThe calculator appears to allow companies enrolling workers for 2015 to offer inexpensive, substandard medical insurance while avoiding the Affordable Care Act’s penalties, consumer advocates say.

Insurance pros are also surprised such plans are permitted.

Employer insurance without hospital coverage “flies in the face of Obamacare,” said Liz Smith, president of employee benefits for Assurance, an Illinois-based insurance brokerage.

At the same time, a kind of catch-22 bars workers at these companies from subsidies to buy more comprehensive coverage on their own through online marketplaces. No federal tax credits for health coverage are available to people with workplace plans approved by the calculator.

The calculator is used by self-insured employers, which include most large firms.

Like insurance companies, self-insured employers must certify that their plans pass health-law standards for consumer value.

One official way to do that is to get a passing score on the Department of Health and Human Services’ “minimum-value” calculator, an online tool.

An employer checks boxes on the screen indicating what benefits are offered —such as hospitalization, mental health care and pharmacy coverage — as well as workers’ share of the cost. The calculator then determines if the plan covers enough potential medical costs to be considered adequate insurance.

“There are a lot of errors in the calculator,” said Shannon Demaree, director of actuarial services at Lockton Companies, a large broker. “It allows more plans to pass as qualifying coverage than we believe really do.”

It’s unclear which companies, or how many, are offering calculator-approved coverage without hospital benefits.  Retailers, temp agencies and other lower-wage employers that haven’t traditionally offered comprehensive insurance are the most likely to sign up, brokers say.

“There is very high interest” among Lockton’s clients, Demaree said.

Some 35 employers working with Assurance plan to offer such coverage, said Smith. The American Worker Plans, another Illinois firm, is advising about 30 companies considering one, said Jon Duczak, the company’s senior vice president.

While they offer such plans because employers ask for them, Assurance and The American Worker Plans said they are cautioning them about their use. They did not identify the employers.

HHS is aware of potential problems with the calculator but has not changed it, said industry authorities.

“I think they were somewhat naïve in not realizing that people were going to game the heck out of it,” said Hobson Carroll, an independent actuary who works closely with self-insured employers. “I’ve got to believe they’ve been getting input from all over” on revising it, he added.

Concerns Raised

Cori Uccello, a senior fellow at the American Academy of Actuaries, a trade group for insurance risk experts, said “several members” have raised “potential issues” about HHS’s software.

“Any inaccuracies in the MV calculator would be of concern,” she said, without elaborating. “We made informal inquiries to appropriate agencies.”

HHS, which developed the calculator, referred queries about it to the Treasury Department, which it says is responsible for ensuring plans meet value standards. Treasury referred a reporter back to HHS.

Intended to discourage coverage that leaves workers vulnerable to large medical costs, the calculator is an official yardstick for determining whether plans meet a “minimum value” of benefits, the most stringent health-law standard for employers.

Passing the calculator test shields an employer from getting fined as much as $3,000 per worker next year, lawyers say.

Instead of buying a commercial medical plan, employers that self-insure assume most of the risk of covering worker health costs. They generally outsource the design of the insurance and the administration of claims, however.

Problems For Workers

The average inpatient hospital bill is more than $10,000. But for workers, the plans’ disadvantages go beyond the lack of hospital benefits.

The availability of company-sponsored, calculator-approved coverage at a certain price disqualifies them from getting tax credits that could help pay for better coverage through an online marketplace, said Sabrina Corlette, project director at Georgetown University’s Center on Health Insurance Reforms.

“Employers who offer these types of plans as the only option for their employees really need to search their consciences,” she said.

Next year, large employers face penalties for the first time for not providing qualified insurance. Benefits experts stressed that most will offer traditional coverage including hospitalization.

But temporary staffing firms are especially interested in lower-value plans that may not include hospitalization, said Brian Robertson, executive vice president at Fringe Benefit Group, which recently bought the The American Worker Plans.

“They are being forced into this game kicking and screaming and they’re trying to figure out, ‘What is my lowest cost to comply?’” with the health law, he said.

Key Benefit Administrators, which designs coverage and handles claims for what it says are more than half a million members, offers a minimum-value plan to self-insured employers that lacks inpatient hospital benefits, according to documents on Assurance’s website.

Key’s design “meets the… actuarial value requirement” measured by the calculator and immunizes employers from paying all health-law penalties for insufficient coverage, the promotional materials say.

The plan’s total cost of about $200 per month per worker is about half the price of similar coverage with hospital benefits, experts said. Offering such coverage might cost an employer little or nothing to satisfy the health law.

That’s because, under ACA affordability rules, workers must be asked to pay no more than 9.5 percent of family income for coverage. So companies could fulfill ACA obligations even if they required employees making more than about $25,000 a year to pay the full, $200-a-month cost.

Confidentiality agreements with customers prohibit Key from commenting on the plan, said Wallace Gray, the company’s general counsel.

Edward Lenz, senior counsel at the American Staffing Association, a trade group for temp and recruiting firms, argued that the calculator works as HHS intended.

“I think they knew what they were doing and were trying to avoid placing unreasonable constraints on large employers,” he said.

Neil Trautwein, the top benefits lawyer at the National Retail Federation, said he was unaware of employers offering supposedly minimum-value plans without hospital benefits. He doubted such plans would pass the minimum-value test.

“I would say that any policy that proposes to satisfy that without hospitalization coverage is pure fantasy,” he said.

Flunking The Test

But such policies can, say insurance pros who have tested Key’s plan and similar coverage on the government software.

“We’ve had a million different attorneys check this out,” Assurance’s Smith said of Key’s design.According to HHS’ standards, “it does meet all the criteria to be a compliant plan,” she said.

But when Lockton tested such plans on a calculator used by the private sector, they flunked.

To meet the health law’s minimum value threshold, self-insured coverage must pay for at least 60 percent of expected medical costs in a typical plan. (Members pay the rest in deductibles, copays and other out-of-pocket expense.)

In Lockton’s analysis, one plan with no hospital benefits being promoted as health-law compliant scored 63 percent on HHS’ calculator — slightly above the minimum. But the industry calculator gave the same plan a value of only 47 percent — far below the 60 percent level needed to qualify as adequate, Demaree said.

“All of their [Lockton’s] concerns are definitely concerns that we’ve had,” said Assurance’s Smith.

Minimum-value plans lacking hospital coverage are different from “skinny plans,” another kind of limited-benefit plan offered by lower-wage firms such as retailers and staffing companies.

Employer-sponsored skinny plans come with preventive-care benefits and little else. Consumer advocates were surprised to learn last year that skinny plans fulfill one ACA requirement for employers, which is to provide “minimum essential coverage.”

Failure to offer minimum essential coverage can cost employers $2,000 per worker.

Advocates hoped that the tougher requirement — for calculator-approved minimum value — would still induce many of these same employers to offer more-comprehensive insurance.

But concerns about the calculator mean that the minimum-value standard may also be weaker than believed.

People offered employer-sponsored, minimum essential coverage are still eligible for subsidies to buy insurance through an online marketplace. But workers offered calculator-certified, minimum-value coverage are not.

Several consultants said they wouldn’t be surprised to see revisions in the minimum-value calculator — if not this year, then next.

“We tell people: ‘Do not rely on the minimum value calculator,’” said Lockton’s Demaree. Brokers are selling a plan “based on the fact that it passes through the MV calculator,” she added. “And that’s when we come in and say, ‘Well, it does, but for how long?’

khn_logo_lightKaiser Health News is an editorially independent program of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonprofit, nonpartisan health policy research and communication organization not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente.

http://www.kaiserhealthnews.org/Stories/2014/September/12/Flaw-In-Federal-Software-Lets-Employers-Offer-Plans-Without-Hospital-Benefits-Consultants-Say.aspx

Hancock, Jay. “Flaw In Federal Software Lets Employers Offer Plans Without Hospital Benefits, Consultants Say.” Kaiser Health News, 12 Sep 2014. Web. 18 Sep 2014.

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Posted in Employer Health Plan Tagged , , , , , , , |

Ralph Weber Talks About Cost Shifting – Video

How do hospitals come up with their prices? Medicare patients cause them to lose money. They have to make up the difference by charging the self-insured more. Non-profit hospitals keep beds vacant or build other facilities so as not to turn a profit. Implementing economic principles to health care would cause costs to decrease.

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Posted in Cost of Health Care Tagged , , , , , , |

Here’s The Thing #4 Cost Shifting HD

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Posted in Common Sense Health Care Solutions, Cost of Health Care, Economics, Employer Health Plan, Health Care Innovation, Insurance, Medibid Television, Obamacare

The Commoditization of Medicine

Parvez Dara, MD, FACP, MBA, author of http://jedismedicine.blogspot.com/, speaks at the AAPS 71st Annual Meeting in Charleston, Continue reading

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Posted in Medibid Television, Tax Increases
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