What was wrong with Healthcare to begin with?

American voters spoke loud and clear when elected officials passed a lousy bill they didn’t understand against the will of the people. Americans by and large still think that government is composed “of the people”, and should act “for the people”. In March of 2010, they did not.

Now, we the people have an opportunity to go back to the drawing board. Before we talk reform, we need to define what we didn’t like about healthcare.

Let’s start by defining healthcare. What is it? Is it your doctor’s bedside manner? Is it the amount of time he/she spends with you? Is it the cost of medical care? Maybe it is the decision on who should pay for your medical care?

If we can’t decide on the above, then how can we define the problems, the causes, and the solutions?

Let’s assume that “healthcare” is all of the above. The obamacare package addressed only one aspect of it, while making the rest worse.

Here’s what we did not like about “healthcare” before this monstrosity passed:

  1. We didn’t like that medical care costs a lot
  2. We didn’t like that some people obtained medical care, and did not pay for it, and then the rest of us got stuck paying to cover their unpaid debts
  3. We didn’t like the short period of time many doctors spend with us
  4. We didn’t like what we perceived as lack of access or choice
  5. We didn’t like that we could lose our employer sponsored health plan if we lost our employer sponsored job
  6. We didn’t like that insurance companies did not cover pre-existing damage or health issues

I’d like to see some comments below on other things that we didn’t like.

4 responses

First off, I am one of “those patients” that medical care people either love or hate, with no middle ground. I want the doctors to explain to me what, exactly is going on and why I have been prescribed a particular medication (I have a blood disorder and do have the opportunity to talk with doctors on a regular basis) I’ve even had one doctor drop off a medical journal article in my hospital room for me to read (I have a science background and was able to understand it).

*: I don’t like the fact that medical insurance, which I pay for, wants too much control over when I can get refills on my prescription. I once tried to get a prescription filled 4 days before I ran out, and the insurance company put up a huge fuss. Also, while my doctor was adjusting my medication dosage, the prescription ran out 2 weeks early… the insurance company freaked out. Since then, I bypass the insurance company’s prescription nonsense and pay for my meds out of pocket.

*: I want my doctor to have the time to explain to me exactly what is going on with me, why he prescribed the meds he did. I dislike not being fully informed.

*: There was once a miscommunication between my doctor’s office and my pharmacy, and the pharmacy attempted to give me the wrong dosage of my medications. I stubbornly insisted that the pharmacy contact my doctor and that someone get my prescription right. I shouldn’t have had to do this.

*: The cost of comparable medical insurance should not differ based upon whether I pay for it directly, out of pocket, or if my employer pays for it.

*: I should have final determination as to who has access to my medical information. My medical history is only applicable to legitimate medical professionals that have a real need to know that information (my doctor and his staff, my dentist and his staff, but not some three-letter government agency)

I think the problems the patient are facing are more or less, identical to what the majority of Americans were (and still are) experiencing right now. A change in the healthcare system and medical insurance schemes are seriously needed!!

I agree with you, but we must be careful when we simply demand “change”, because as we have seen, change can be bad too. We need good change, and we need to spell it out. I don’t trust any politician enough to demand “change” and expect it to be good.

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