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  • Implanted Heart Devices Affected by iPads May 27, 2015
    A new study has found that the magnetic interference from iPads could alter the settings or even deactivate implanted defibrillators. This interference comes from the magnets imbedded in the iPad 2 and its Smart Cover. Magnets in the heart devices …
  • Canadian Cancer Patient Says Korean Surgery Saved His Life May 22, 2015
    Gerd Trubenbach of British Columbia was diagnosed with cancer, as a huge tumor was growing in his neck. His family doctor suggested that the tumor could not be removed and there was nothing else that could be done. The wait …
  • How to Prevent Hemorrhoids May 20, 2015
    Many people have hemorrhoids at some time, and they are a common problem. Hemorrhoids are swollen veins in the anal canal, which can be painful but not usually serious. They are caused from too much pressure on the veins in …
  • Emergency Room Visits Increase with Obamacare May 15, 2015
    Obamacare predicted that expanding health insurance coverage for the poor would reduce costly emergency room visits. A new study has found that newly insured people are actually visiting the ER more often, 40% more often than those who are uninsured. …
  • Transparency: Changing the US Healthcare System May 13, 2015
    Ralph Weber, President and CEO of MediBid, is interviewed by David Saltzman of ShiftShapers. Mr. Weber has been in the benefits business since the mid 1990s, serving clients in the US, Canada, and around the globe. A lack of information …
  • Appalachia Sees Increased Cases of Hepatitis C May 11, 2015
    Infections of Hepatitis C, a contagious liver infection spread by blood contact, has more than tripled in Appalachia – Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia – fueled by prescription drug abuse in rural areas. About 73% of patients are under …

Free Market Medical

When a company purchases “Healthcare”, they are buying a medicratic system of payments. Whereas medical care used to be the product, it is now simply a byproduct used to increase the profitability of “healthcare”.

Most companies have purchasing guidelines used for buying computers, printers, and other equipment. These guidelines usually involve getting 3 competitive bids before they purchase. We may do this when buying a “health plan”, but the health plan is based on opacity, price fixing, and the suppression of competition. MediBid tenders out each and every medical procedure, allowing the buyer to review competing bids and comparing them on the basis of cost, quality, and location. This works when buying equipment, and guess what! It also works when implemented with a health plan to purchase medical care.

It is widely believed that advances in technology reduce the cost of most goods. So why do healthcare costs escalate at two to three times the rate of wage growth despite technological advances? What if we totally changed the paradigm, and applied new criteria to the question? What if we asked the question; why do costs decrease when we apply corporate purchasing guidelines of competitive bidding, while healthcare costs escalate at 2-3 times the rate of inflation because we use a system of price fixing, opacity, and suppression of competition? If we change that paradigm, will technological advances in medicine be unleashed allowing sustainable cost reductions through a competitive market?

Have we simply been using the wrong assumption when asking the question?

For ONE corporate client alone, we project savings of $1,344,000 per year based on the competitive bidding process for ONE procedure that their employees use 2,400 times per year. IMAGINE if we put out to bid the top dozen procedures? Oh, and by the way, that one procedure is not a high cost procedure, nor is it their most often used procedure.

The next time you wonder why a TV or computer costs less today than it did five years ago, which healthcare costs more than it did five years ago, ask yourself the following question: “Did technology improvements decrease the cost of one, and increase the cost of another product, or did a competitive billing process employed by corporations, and individuals decrease the cost of TV’s, which price fixing increased the costs of healthcare?