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  • Beat the Summer Heat with Food July 29, 2015
    by Adrienne Snavely As we sit in the middle of summer, it seems as if the persistently sweltering heat will never end and the refreshing monsoon rains will never reach our doorstep. While waiting for the cooler days (and months) …
  • Thousands of Taxpayers Overpay Obamacare Tax Penalty July 27, 2015
    Over 300,000 Americans overpaid the IRS after indicating they did not have Obamacare-compatible health insurance. People who have household income below the threshold for the penalty are exempt from the individual mandate and should be refunded the amount, averaging $110, …
  • Eating Nuts Helps Your Heart July 24, 2015
    Nuts contain unsaturated fatty acids, which lower LDL cholesterol levels. Nuts also reduce the risk of developing fatal blood clots and improve the lining of your arteries. The type of nut isn’t that important, as most nuts are full of …
  • “Medjacking” is Real Possible Threat July 22, 2015
    Dr. David Armstrong, a podiatric surgeon and professor in the University of Arizona Department of Surgery, has joined forces with government security agencies to keep patients safe from medjacking. He is part of a cybersecurity committee for diabetes devices, which …
  • Ways to Handle Stress July 20, 2015
    Stress can be caused by many different situations, such as too much work, long lines, or heavy traffic. There are a few simple techniques to help you de-stress and unwind. 1. Positive Self-Talk We talk to ourselves both out loud …
  • A Remedy for Healthcare July 17, 2015
    This video is from a series called “Love Gov”, which personifies the government as an overprotective, possessive boyfriend who thinks he knows best for his dear Alexis. When it comes to healthcare, Gov thinks he needs to be involved in …

Free Market Medical

When a company purchases “Healthcare”, they are buying a medicratic system of payments. Whereas medical care used to be the product, it is now simply a byproduct used to increase the profitability of “healthcare”.

Most companies have purchasing guidelines used for buying computers, printers, and other equipment. These guidelines usually involve getting 3 competitive bids before they purchase. We may do this when buying a “health plan”, but the health plan is based on opacity, price fixing, and the suppression of competition. MediBid tenders out each and every medical procedure, allowing the buyer to review competing bids and comparing them on the basis of cost, quality, and location. This works when buying equipment, and guess what! It also works when implemented with a health plan to purchase medical care.

It is widely believed that advances in technology reduce the cost of most goods. So why do healthcare costs escalate at two to three times the rate of wage growth despite technological advances? What if we totally changed the paradigm, and applied new criteria to the question? What if we asked the question; why do costs decrease when we apply corporate purchasing guidelines of competitive bidding, while healthcare costs escalate at 2-3 times the rate of inflation because we use a system of price fixing, opacity, and suppression of competition? If we change that paradigm, will technological advances in medicine be unleashed allowing sustainable cost reductions through a competitive market?

Have we simply been using the wrong assumption when asking the question?

For ONE corporate client alone, we project savings of $1,344,000 per year based on the competitive bidding process for ONE procedure that their employees use 2,400 times per year. IMAGINE if we put out to bid the top dozen procedures? Oh, and by the way, that one procedure is not a high cost procedure, nor is it their most often used procedure.

The next time you wonder why a TV or computer costs less today than it did five years ago, which healthcare costs more than it did five years ago, ask yourself the following question: “Did technology improvements decrease the cost of one, and increase the cost of another product, or did a competitive billing process employed by corporations, and individuals decrease the cost of TV’s, which price fixing increased the costs of healthcare?