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  • Make Spring Cleaning a Workout April 17, 2015
    Chores you do around the house and garden can burn calories and stretch and tone muscles if done correctly. Short episodes of mild exercise can improve your fitness level if done with intensity and speed. Adding 30 minutes of chores …
  • Provisioning for the Opt Out Journey April 17, 2015
    Ophthalmologist David Richardson, MD on how to prepare for opting out of Medicare. From AAPS 70th Annual Meeting, September 2013, Denver, Colorado.
  • What America’s Decline in Economic Freedom Means for Entrepreneurship and Prosperity April 16, 2015
    The United States was once considered the land of opportunity where entrepreneurs such as Henry Ford, Ray Kroc and Steve Jobs contributed to a flourishing economy by providing new products and services at prices people were happy to pay.Today America’s …
  • Obamacare Fines Debut This Tax Season April 15, 2015
    Taxes for 2014 are due this week, and your tax bill could be affected by your health insurance. If you had insurance during the entire calendar year of 2014 through an employer, a state exchange, or Medicare Part A, you …
  • Blood Transfusions: Less is More April 13, 2015
    The most common inpatient medical procedure in 2011 was the blood transfusion, with 12% of all hospitalized patients receiving one. The accrediting nonprofit Joint Commission reports transfusions as one of the five most overused hospital procedures. Now, there is a …
  • Health “Coverage” is Just a Distraction April 10, 2015
    by G. Keith Smith, MD I think it is good to be alert to any discussions that are “downstream of a flawed premise.” Let me explain. When I hear, for instance, that the “flat tax” is preferable to the current income …

Free Market Medical

When a company purchases “Healthcare”, they are buying a medicratic system of payments. Whereas medical care used to be the product, it is now simply a byproduct used to increase the profitability of “healthcare”.

Most companies have purchasing guidelines used for buying computers, printers, and other equipment. These guidelines usually involve getting 3 competitive bids before they purchase. We may do this when buying a “health plan”, but the health plan is based on opacity, price fixing, and the suppression of competition. MediBid tenders out each and every medical procedure, allowing the buyer to review competing bids and comparing them on the basis of cost, quality, and location. This works when buying equipment, and guess what! It also works when implemented with a health plan to purchase medical care.

It is widely believed that advances in technology reduce the cost of most goods. So why do healthcare costs escalate at two to three times the rate of wage growth despite technological advances? What if we totally changed the paradigm, and applied new criteria to the question? What if we asked the question; why do costs decrease when we apply corporate purchasing guidelines of competitive bidding, while healthcare costs escalate at 2-3 times the rate of inflation because we use a system of price fixing, opacity, and suppression of competition? If we change that paradigm, will technological advances in medicine be unleashed allowing sustainable cost reductions through a competitive market?

Have we simply been using the wrong assumption when asking the question?

For ONE corporate client alone, we project savings of $1,344,000 per year based on the competitive bidding process for ONE procedure that their employees use 2,400 times per year. IMAGINE if we put out to bid the top dozen procedures? Oh, and by the way, that one procedure is not a high cost procedure, nor is it their most often used procedure.

The next time you wonder why a TV or computer costs less today than it did five years ago, which healthcare costs more than it did five years ago, ask yourself the following question: “Did technology improvements decrease the cost of one, and increase the cost of another product, or did a competitive billing process employed by corporations, and individuals decrease the cost of TV’s, which price fixing increased the costs of healthcare?