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  • How to Fight and Prevent Sugar Cravings February 27, 2015
    The average American consumes about 16 teaspoons more sugar per day than what is recommended. Sugar causes the brain to release serotonin, creating a natural high, and the endorphins leave us wanting more. Kicking a sugar addiction can be tough, …
  • Hospital Closures Bring “New Day” in Healthcare February 25, 2015
    Hospitals are operating with fewer beds or closing, as patients seek more affordable medical care at clinics and outpatient surgery centers. A low occupancy rate makes for a high-priced facility, which is not competitive. These closures are due to the …
  • Do Your Part to Protect Your Heart – February Special February 23, 2015
    February is Heart month. Protect the health of your heart, preventing heart disease and stroke, with a simple blood test. Below are the February specials from DirectLabs. Lipid Profile – $19 (Regular Price $29, $98 Retail) Test includes: Cholesterol, Total …
  • The Various Dimensions of Mammogram Screening February 20, 2015
    by Adrienne Snavely Every year, over 200,000 women in the U.S. are diagnosed with breast cancer and about 40,000 will die from it. When breast cancer is detected early, it is easier to treat. Forty million mammograms are performed each …
  • Crashing the Free Market Party February 16, 2015
    by G. Keith Smith MD Riding in to rescue the victims of Obamacare and other government healthcare schemes are guess who? The legislators? The regulators? Don’t make me laugh. It is the growing group of healthcare free marketeers. The celebration …
  • Dark Chocolate is Good For You and Your Valentine February 13, 2015
    Dark chocolate is loaded with nutrients, one of the best sources of antioxidants, and can improve health and lower risk of heart disease. Dark chocolate is very nutritious. It contains a fair amount of soluble fiber and is full of …

Free Market Medical

When a company purchases “Healthcare”, they are buying a medicratic system of payments. Whereas medical care used to be the product, it is now simply a byproduct used to increase the profitability of “healthcare”.

Most companies have purchasing guidelines used for buying computers, printers, and other equipment. These guidelines usually involve getting 3 competitive bids before they purchase. We may do this when buying a “health plan”, but the health plan is based on opacity, price fixing, and the suppression of competition. MediBid tenders out each and every medical procedure, allowing the buyer to review competing bids and comparing them on the basis of cost, quality, and location. This works when buying equipment, and guess what! It also works when implemented with a health plan to purchase medical care.

It is widely believed that advances in technology reduce the cost of most goods. So why do healthcare costs escalate at two to three times the rate of wage growth despite technological advances? What if we totally changed the paradigm, and applied new criteria to the question? What if we asked the question; why do costs decrease when we apply corporate purchasing guidelines of competitive bidding, while healthcare costs escalate at 2-3 times the rate of inflation because we use a system of price fixing, opacity, and suppression of competition? If we change that paradigm, will technological advances in medicine be unleashed allowing sustainable cost reductions through a competitive market?

Have we simply been using the wrong assumption when asking the question?

For ONE corporate client alone, we project savings of $1,344,000 per year based on the competitive bidding process for ONE procedure that their employees use 2,400 times per year. IMAGINE if we put out to bid the top dozen procedures? Oh, and by the way, that one procedure is not a high cost procedure, nor is it their most often used procedure.

The next time you wonder why a TV or computer costs less today than it did five years ago, which healthcare costs more than it did five years ago, ask yourself the following question: “Did technology improvements decrease the cost of one, and increase the cost of another product, or did a competitive billing process employed by corporations, and individuals decrease the cost of TV’s, which price fixing increased the costs of healthcare?