RSS Articles and Information

Physicians Have Spoken, and the American Medical Association (AMA), Represents their Interests No Longer

The American Medical Association (AMA), the largest and oldest medical association in the United States, no longer represents the interests or opinions of the physicians they are supposed to represent. According to a recent Jackson and Coker industry report survey, an astonishing 77% of physicians don’t think the American Medical Association (AMA) represents their views, 70% of physicians disagreed with the AMA’s stance on health reform , 74% of physicians think the AMA is NOT a successful  advocate for physician’s issues, only 11% of physicians think the AMA is effective at lobbying for tort reform, 69% of physicians think the AMA is effective in supporting physician practice autonomy, astonishing 78% of physicians think the AMA is NOT effective at insulating them from intrusive government regulations, 75% of physicians think the AMA does NOT protect them from insurance company abuses, and only 13% of physicians think the AMA acts to protect physician reimbursement. It seems the AMA’s loyalty lies not to the profession it was created to preserve and protect, but to the CPT codes that produce 84% of its annual revenue.

 

Physicians Say the AMA No Longer Their Voice

9:33 am September 8, 2011, by Wayne Oliver – vice president, Center for Health Transformation

They say, “Perception is reality.” If that is the case, the American Medical Association (AMA) is in serious trouble.

In a recent survey of physicians conducted by the Atlanta-based physician recruitment firm Jackson & Coker, doctors believe that the AMA no longer represents their views. A whopping 77 percent of physicians reject that premise that the AMA currently reflects their profession. Only 11 percent said the nation’s oldest doctors’ organization today stands for what they do. (To view the survey, go to: http://www.jacksoncoker.com/news/News.aspx?sc_cid=AMA)

When asked if they agreed with the AMA’s support of federal health reform, physicians said the organization sold out the nation’s medical profession. The AMA’s high profile endorsement of ObamaCare has been questioned by AMA and non-AMA member physicians from every corner of the country.

So why did the AMA turn its back on the medical professional?

Many believe that the AMA is deeply conflicted. You see, the AMA was torn between generating revenue versus reflecting the position of America’s practicing physicians. The AMA owns the mechanism by which the entire healthcare delivery system is reimbursed – a coding system used for Medicaid and Medicare reimbursements and then utilized in the private health insurance market. The contract for CPT codes or Current Procedural Technology belongs exclusively to the AMA.

In 2008, the AMA collected an estimated $70 million from books, workshops, and licensed data files related to CPT codes, according to the National Center for Policy Analysis. Membership dues accounted for less than 16 percent of 2008 revenues, according to the NCPA.

Clearly, the AMA is conflicted between the revenue which is generated by the CPT coding system and doing what’s right for the medical profession.

And, the Jackson & Coker poll speaks volumes about this conflict.

When asked why former AMA member physicians dropped their AMA membership, over half pointed to the “CPT business is a conflict of interest.”

And the current CPT coding system is also a major barrier to fundamental, comprehensive and legitimate healthcare reform.

Most experts agree that ObamaCare was little more than a band-aid on a system which needs real change. There are no CPT codes for creating a system which rewards improved health outcomes. There are no CPT codes which pay physicians and hospitals for providing outstanding patient care. The CPT coding system reinforces the status quo. So, when the AMA endorsed national health reform, it did so to preserve the current system which is clearly broken.

But what does this mean going forward?

First, the Jackson & Coker survey reaffirms that the AMA is out of touch with the thoughts and beliefs of most physicians. More than 70 percent of the responding doctors said that the AMA no longer represents physicians. Secondly, as more and more medical doctors leave the AMA, there will be opportunities for organizations like AAPS, Docs for Patient Care (Docs4PatientCare), and state medical associations to step in to more accurately reflect the needs of physicians. Seventy-five percent of the physicians surveyed by Jackson & Coker indicate that “physicians need a more representative voice.” And lastly, issues like tort reform, government over-regulation of the medical profession and legitimate healthcare reform will be addressed by some organization other than the AMA.

There is a fundamental difference between leadership and representation. Unfortunately for America’s physicians, the AMA is doing neither.

Oliver is a vice president at the Center for Health Transformation, founded by former Speaker Newt Gingrich.

 

 

No related content found.



At MediBid, we restore market forces to medical care. Doctors get to set their own rates based on their training, experience, and outcomes, and patients get to shop for medical care across state lines and international borders. Many times with MediBid, you will find procedures that are more effective than procedures allowed, or covered by health plans. Transparency and competition are the only way to achieve reasonable costs. Many of our employer clients offering group health insurance through MediBid save $5,000 per employee per year. Those are substantial savings. Patients are saving an average of 48% vs. insurance discounted rates, or 80% vs. retail. Contact us for more information.
Share

Comments

This entry was posted in Health Care News, Health Care Reform and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.
Categories
Bulk Email Sender

Switch to our mobile site