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  • Maine doctors ditch insurance, offer monthly subscriptions for primary care April 23, 2014
    Dr. Michael Ciampi of Bangor, Maine stopped taking insurance last year. Now, along with the fee-for-service practice model, he has added a subscription option.  A monthly fee covers all office visits from physicals to diagnostic testing to minor in-office procedures.  …
  • Haggling for Health Care April 21, 2014
    There are new ways to cut your medical costs dramatically. John BenJohn of New York placed a request for nasal polyp surgery on MediBid and had no outstanding bills or hidden charges after the procedure. After placing a procedure request, …
  • Are Eggs Good for You? 30 Reasons to Eat Eggs April 18, 2014
    Eggs have gotten a bad rap in the past and unfortunately, many today still believe the wide spread misinformation. Are eggs good for you? Do they cause heart disease? Do they raise cholesterol? Should I avoid them? Depending on who …
  • The Commercial Gym – A Little House of Horrors April 16, 2014
    by Lee Kurisko, MD I’m was on vacation a week ago in Florida.  I was more than happy to vacate Minnesota that week.  Despite being the first week of April, Minnesota is still getting snow.  My kids are teenagers so …
  • The Difference Matters: Dick Morris Interviews Jan Iverson April 15, 2014
    Jan Iverson speaks to Dick Morris, on April 14, 2014, about citizen-led efforts to hold Hillary Clinton accountable for the Benghazi cover up.
  • Arkansas Surgical Hospital Ranked Among Most Affordable in Statewide Study April 14, 2014
    San Francisco (April 9, 2014) – NerdWallet Health, a website that empowers consumers to make better decisions about healthcare and insurance, has found the ten most affordable hospitals in Arkansas – and North Little Rock-based Arkansas Surgical Hospital ranks sixth. …
  • Costa Rica Vacation & Medical Check-up Special April 11, 2014
    5 Days and 4 Nights Package to Costa Rica is available for $1899! It includes over 25 individual laboratory tests and scans to provide a thorough Biochemical assessment of your health, as well as 2 day tours in the area! …
  • MediBid Safe From Heartbleed Bug April 10, 2014
    As I’m sure most of you have heard, an encryption flaw in the OpenSSL cryptographic software library has inadvertently caused one of the biggest security threats ever seen on the internet. The OpenSSL cryptographic software library is used to secure …
  • Dr. Jeffrey Gallups Interviews Ralph Weber about MediBid April 9, 2014
    MediBid does what the government and politicians have been unable to do — offer low medical costs and choices.  MediBid was initially developed for Canadian patients on medical waiting lists.  Employers were interested in the model to provide benefits for …
  • The three most dangerous poisons to never eat, drink or inject again April 5, 2014
    Episode 2 of “Awakenings” with the Health Ranger reveals the 3 most insidious poisons you should NEVER eat, drink or inject again! Hear more episodes of Awakenings at NaturalNews.com
  • How to live GMO-free – Awakenings with the Health Ranger April 4, 2014
    Important tips on how to live a GMO-free life. Get Monsanto out of your food and off your back!This is episode 1 of the Health Ranger’s new series “Awakenings.” See more Awakenings episodes at NaturalNews.com
  • The Road to Serfdom is Paved with Good Intentions April 2, 2014
    by Marilyn M. Singleton, M.D., J.D. What do TSA groping, NSA data-mining, and mercury-laced fluorescent light bulbs have to do with keeping your doctor? They are the products of seductively entitled but flawed laws. As Daniel Webster said, “good intentions …
  • The Patient Physician Relationship Under ObamaCare April 1, 2014
    AAPS Capitol Hill Briefing: March 27, 2014 Currently there is a lot of discussion regarding health care exchanges and access to insurance. However, insurance is not care. Even if the exchanges are eventually fixed, they cannot assure access to care. …
  • After three years, Edison woman’s life is getting back on track March 31, 2014
    Debbie Pasnak suffered several broken bones in a fall, but Medicaid denied her the medical procedures she required for treatment. Medicaid kept her waiting for surgery in hospitals and rehab centers for three years. Eventually, her friend told her about …
  • If You Like Your Scam, You Can Keep It: the Attack on Out-of-Network Doctors March 28, 2014
    by G. Keith Smith, MD A patient who wanted to have a procedure at our facility asked us to file insurance. We discovered that if she had her surgery at our facility rather than at an “in network” hospital, her …
  • Doc discovers Obamacare’s shocking, dirty secret March 26, 2014
    by Lee Hieb, MD I am being impacted in many ways by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, or, to give credit where credit is due, “Obamacare.” But the most stunning attack on my person came this month in …
  • Webinar: MOC Update, Paul Kempen, MD, PhD & Ken Christman, MD March 26, 2014
    Learn more at http://ChangeBoardRecert.com. “MOC, MOL, OCC and now C-MOC Beyond mere Board Certification” Presented March 23, 2014 by Paul Kempen, MD, PhD with intro by Ken Christman, MD.
  • Free Markets in Healthcare Aren’t “Broken” – Just Not Allowed to Work March 24, 2014
    by Elizabeth Lee Vliet, MD Democrats excel at “message discipline”—sticking to talking points whether their script is factually correct or not. Repeated often enough, the script becomes “truth.” Democrats’ script says: “The U.S. healthcare system is broken. Free-markets didn’t work; …
  • 2014 03 23 13 02 MOC Update March 24, 2014
  • A Better Way to Save $1 Trillion March 21, 2014
    Cutting back on national medical spending would save money, but the quality of patient care would decrease and waiting times would increase.  These are the problems other countries are having.  Money is saved by creating a free market in medical …

Alieta Eck, M.D. On How Government Job Creation is Not Always a Good Thing

Government Job Creation Is Not Always a Good Thing

By: Alieta Eck, M.D.

When economist Milton Friedman observed mine workers in China digging a canal using shovels, he asked why they were not using modern machinery. He was told that this was a “jobs program” and that using shovels employed more workers. Friedman then quipped that they should give the workers spoons, not shovels. China had lost sight of the fact that the purpose of the work was to build a canal to increase commerce and enhance the lives of the citizens. Using machinery would lower the cost of the project and benefit the taxpayers.

When the government hires someone, the goal should be to provide for the common good and benefit those who are footing the bill. Value needs to be a primary consideration, as creating a job for the job’s sake only robs the taxpayer. Every dollar that is taxed or borrowed makes the taxpayer less free and less able to spend his own money on the needs of his own family. Taxes should be carefully spent.

With medical care, the first question must be, “Is providing medical care the proper role of government?” Then secondly, “If the government is going to provide a safety net for the poor, what is the most efficient way to do this?”

When Medicaid began in 1965, poor patients were given a card that entitled them to go to a doctor with the doctor sending the bill to the government. At first this seemed to work. The government paid the going rate—the rate the doctor needed to pay his staff and office overhead. This continued for about 20 years or so, until the law of unintended consequences overwhelmed the system.

Government money flowed. Medical costs went up, and the economy struggled. The government responded by ratcheting down the fees, and physicians dropped out. By 1990, the Medicaid payments were below the cost to provide the service, so patients on Medicaid had difficulty finding a physician.

Along came the idea of the Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs).

FQHCs are privately owned clinics that are non-profit. If they can prove they will be providing care in an underserved area, they are given $600,000 in federal dollars to start. This does not represent good value to the taxpayer. Key employees are well compensated and the board is often given extravagant expense accounts. Travel and “recruitment expenses” can reach hundreds of thousands of dollars without attracting notice.

FQHCs lobby for money from the federal and state governments, get “enhanced” Medicaid dollars, and have full medical malpractice coverage by the federal government. They see the poor, but also see people with insurance or who pay cash. They claim costs of $140-160 per patient visit, so constantly ask for more taxpayer dollars. Politicians, not wanting to appear callous toward the poor, comply.

State budgets are over-stretched, with Medicaid taking one-third, more than the cost of education. Today one in seven Americans is on Medicaid. And bureaucracy inflates the cost by a factor of ten.

It is time to recognize that government charity is too expensive, with minimal funds spent on actual care and a lot spent on paperwork, eligibility determination, fraud and abuse, and attempts to root out fraud and abuse. We could accomplish the same goal of caring for the poor while costing the taxpayer a lot less.

Why not provide protection to physicians who choose to volunteer their services to treat the poor in non-government free clinics? Patients who find themselves ill and poor would know that there is a clinic nearby, staffed by volunteers. The taxpayers would be relieved of having to pay billions in wasteful Medicaid dollars.

If the state covered the liability of such physicians, they would order fewer tests, and this in turn would lower wasteful expenditures, and thus perhaps lower everyone’s health insurance premiums.

Relieving the tax burden leaves more money to use for creating lasting, productive private jobs.

But we will have to convince our President, who thinks that extending unemployment benefits is a way to create jobs. The unemployed aren’t even digging with spoons. They aren’t digging at all!


Dr. Alieta Eck, MDgraduated from the Rutgers College of Pharmacy in NJ and the St. Louis School of Medicine in St. Louis, MO. She studied Internal Medicine at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Brunswick, NJ and has been in private practice with her husband, Dr. John Eck, MD in Piscataway, NJ since 1988. She has been involved in health care reform since residency and is convinced that the government is a poor provider of medical care. She testified before the Joint Economic Committee of the US Congress in 2004 about better ways to deliver health care in the United States. In 2003, she and her husband founded the Zarephath Health Center, a free clinic for the poor and uninsured that currently cares for 300-400 patients per month utilizing the donated services of volunteer physicians and nurses. Dr. Eck is a long time member of the Christian Medical Dental Association and in 2009 joined the board of the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons. In addition, she serves on the board of Christian Care Medi-Share, a faith based medical



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