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  • Ralph Weber Talks MediCrats with FreedomWorks – Part 3 January 26, 2015
    MediBid is the free market answer to rising healthcare costs. Employer-sponsored plans, as well as self-insured individuals, make up most of MediBid’s customers. On MediBid, a patient makes a procedure request which gets sent out to physicians and facilities around …
  • Medical Debt Still a Problem for Those With Health Insurance January 23, 2015
    by Adrienne Snavely Medical debt can affect anyone of any age in any state in any income bracket. Medical debts account for more than half of debt collections on credit reports. One in three Americans struggle to pay medical bills, …
  • Q&A with Direct Pay Physicians January 22, 2015
    Direct pay physicians answer colleagues’ questions about third-party-free medical practice. From January 9, 2015, New Orleans AAPS workshop.
  • Ralph Weber Talks MediCrats with FreedomWorks – Part 2 January 21, 2015
    The pitfalls of Obamacare are that it makes healthcare affordable to the employee, yet unaffordable to dependents. Some plans cover children, but not spouses. This means less options for families. The independent physicians are being bought out by hospitals and …
  • Cash and out-of-network: good for medicine as free agency is for sports January 21, 2015
    Andrew Schlafly, J.D., General Counsel, AAPS, opens the 21st Thrive, Not Just Survive workshop held Jan. 9, 2015 in New Orleans, LA.
  • Opting Out of Medicare January 20, 2015
    Lawrence Huntoon, MD, PhD, presents via Skype at the AAPS 21st Thrive Not Just Survive Workshop on Third Party Free Practice, January 9, 2015
  • Say Goodbye to 3rd Party Medical Payments January 19, 2015
    Obamacare is increasing costs, restricting access to care, and putting Medicrats in charge. Out of this adversity comes innovative physicians who are changing the world of medical care. Doctors know what is best for their patients, so they must be …
  • My Direct Pay Practice January 19, 2015
    Brenda Arnett, MD http://arnettmd.com, talks about why and how she launched a third-party-free internal medicine practice. From January 9, 2015.
  • AtlasMD: Direct Pay Primary Care better for patients and physicians January 18, 2015
    Dr. Josh Umbehr, founder of http://atlas.md speaks at AAPS XXI Thrive Not Just Survive Workshop, January 9, 2015 in New Orleans, LA.
  • Epiphany Health, Affordable, high-quality direct primary care January 17, 2015
    Lee Gross, MD, Founder, Epiphany Health http://www.epiphanyhealth.net & President, Docs 4 Patient Care Foundation http://www.d4pcfoundation.org addresses the AAPS Thrive Not Just Survive XXI conference, January 9, 2015, in New Orleans, Louisiana.
  • Ralph Weber Talks MediCrats with FreedomWorks – Part 1 January 16, 2015
    Wayne Brough of FreedomWorks interviews MediBid’s CEO, Ralph Weber, about Obamacare and Weber’s book MediCrats. Weber has found innovative ways to bring the free market to healthcare. MediCrats, by definition, are medical bureaucrats who add administrative burdens and increase costs. …
  • Third Party Free Specialty Practice January 16, 2015
    Gerard J. Gianoli, M.D., F.A.C.S. of The Ear and Balance Institute, Covington, Louisiana, http://EarAndBalance.net speaks at the AAPS Thrive, Not Just Survive workshop held January 9, 2015 in New Orleans.
  • Stop the Interstate Licensing Compact January 15, 2015
    Dr. Ken Christman explains how the FSMB’s proposed compact is a backdoor for MOC and MOL. January 9, 2015, New Orleans, LA.
  • Update on AAPS Legal Initiatives in War on Doctors and Patients January 15, 2015
    Andrew Schlafly wraps up Thrive XXI with a look at ongoing and future AAPS legal initiatives to protect patients and their physicians.
  • The Answer to American Medicine is NOT Coming from DC January 15, 2015
    … it is coming from physicians who are kicking ObamaCare and insurance OUT and working directly with their patients, explains AAPS Executive Director, Jane M. Orient, MD. From AAPS Thrive, Not Just Survive XXI, Jan. 9, 2015, New Orleans, LA.
  • The End of the 10-Minute Doctor’s Appointment January 14, 2015
    The patient-physician relationship should be balanced, not one-sided with physicians skimping on visit time and not allowing patients to ask enough questions or explain their symptoms well. Eighteen seconds is the average time a patient is allowed to talk before …
  • The Physicians Declaration of Independence in 2015 January 14, 2015
    We need a critical mass of truly independent doctors and core who will pass along the art of medicine to the next generation, explains AAPS President Richard Amerling, MD on January 9, 2015 at talk to colleagues in New Orleans, …
  • Physicians & Patients: Take Your Power Back January 14, 2015
    Dr. Elaina George explains that it is crucial for patients and physicians to work together outside of ObamaCare and insurance-dominated system. She discusses alternatives to ObamaCare such as health care sharing programs like Liberty HealthShare: http://LibertyOnCall.com
  • Self-Funded Awareness & The Movie “Dune” January 7, 2015
    by G. Keith Smith, MD “The sleeper has awakened.” Anyone who has seen the movie “Dune” knows the scene where Paul Atreides proclaims his new awareness. Having recently attended the annual meeting of the Self-Insurance Institute of America I was …
  • Perils of Obamacare Reenrollment January 5, 2015
    Obama has come up with the 95% solution to make reenrollment figures look good: A senior federal official told CNBC that an estimated 95 percent of HealthCare.gov enrollees—some 5.1 million people—will be signed up for the 2015 plan year and …

Alieta Eck, M.D. On How Government Job Creation is Not Always a Good Thing

Government Job Creation Is Not Always a Good Thing

By: Alieta Eck, M.D.

When economist Milton Friedman observed mine workers in China digging a canal using shovels, he asked why they were not using modern machinery. He was told that this was a “jobs program” and that using shovels employed more workers. Friedman then quipped that they should give the workers spoons, not shovels. China had lost sight of the fact that the purpose of the work was to build a canal to increase commerce and enhance the lives of the citizens. Using machinery would lower the cost of the project and benefit the taxpayers.

When the government hires someone, the goal should be to provide for the common good and benefit those who are footing the bill. Value needs to be a primary consideration, as creating a job for the job’s sake only robs the taxpayer. Every dollar that is taxed or borrowed makes the taxpayer less free and less able to spend his own money on the needs of his own family. Taxes should be carefully spent.

With medical care, the first question must be, “Is providing medical care the proper role of government?” Then secondly, “If the government is going to provide a safety net for the poor, what is the most efficient way to do this?”

When Medicaid began in 1965, poor patients were given a card that entitled them to go to a doctor with the doctor sending the bill to the government. At first this seemed to work. The government paid the going rate—the rate the doctor needed to pay his staff and office overhead. This continued for about 20 years or so, until the law of unintended consequences overwhelmed the system.

Government money flowed. Medical costs went up, and the economy struggled. The government responded by ratcheting down the fees, and physicians dropped out. By 1990, the Medicaid payments were below the cost to provide the service, so patients on Medicaid had difficulty finding a physician.

Along came the idea of the Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs).

FQHCs are privately owned clinics that are non-profit. If they can prove they will be providing care in an underserved area, they are given $600,000 in federal dollars to start. This does not represent good value to the taxpayer. Key employees are well compensated and the board is often given extravagant expense accounts. Travel and “recruitment expenses” can reach hundreds of thousands of dollars without attracting notice.

FQHCs lobby for money from the federal and state governments, get “enhanced” Medicaid dollars, and have full medical malpractice coverage by the federal government. They see the poor, but also see people with insurance or who pay cash. They claim costs of $140-160 per patient visit, so constantly ask for more taxpayer dollars. Politicians, not wanting to appear callous toward the poor, comply.

State budgets are over-stretched, with Medicaid taking one-third, more than the cost of education. Today one in seven Americans is on Medicaid. And bureaucracy inflates the cost by a factor of ten.

It is time to recognize that government charity is too expensive, with minimal funds spent on actual care and a lot spent on paperwork, eligibility determination, fraud and abuse, and attempts to root out fraud and abuse. We could accomplish the same goal of caring for the poor while costing the taxpayer a lot less.

Why not provide protection to physicians who choose to volunteer their services to treat the poor in non-government free clinics? Patients who find themselves ill and poor would know that there is a clinic nearby, staffed by volunteers. The taxpayers would be relieved of having to pay billions in wasteful Medicaid dollars.

If the state covered the liability of such physicians, they would order fewer tests, and this in turn would lower wasteful expenditures, and thus perhaps lower everyone’s health insurance premiums.

Relieving the tax burden leaves more money to use for creating lasting, productive private jobs.

But we will have to convince our President, who thinks that extending unemployment benefits is a way to create jobs. The unemployed aren’t even digging with spoons. They aren’t digging at all!


Dr. Alieta Eck, MDgraduated from the Rutgers College of Pharmacy in NJ and the St. Louis School of Medicine in St. Louis, MO. She studied Internal Medicine at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Brunswick, NJ and has been in private practice with her husband, Dr. John Eck, MD in Piscataway, NJ since 1988. She has been involved in health care reform since residency and is convinced that the government is a poor provider of medical care. She testified before the Joint Economic Committee of the US Congress in 2004 about better ways to deliver health care in the United States. In 2003, she and her husband founded the Zarephath Health Center, a free clinic for the poor and uninsured that currently cares for 300-400 patients per month utilizing the donated services of volunteer physicians and nurses. Dr. Eck is a long time member of the Christian Medical Dental Association and in 2009 joined the board of the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons. In addition, she serves on the board of Christian Care Medi-Share, a faith based medical



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