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  • Why You Should Eat More Prunes November 24, 2014
    Many people are not fans of prunes, yet sales of “dried plums” are on the rise. Prunes have been a popular digestive remedy for decades with their fiber, stool loosener, and natural laxative compound. They are a sweet treat for …
  • ACA Architect Gruber Insults Voters November 21, 2014
    MIT economist Jonathan Gruber (an architect of Obamacare) has emerged in a handful of videos insulting the American public. In one video, Gruber discusses how voters’ “lack of economic understanding” enabled a politically unpopular tax on “Cadillac” health plans to …
  • Are You Vitamin D Deficient? November 19, 2014
    Many Americans believe they are not at risk for Vitamin D deficiency because they eat D-fortified foods. These foods do not contain enough Vitamin D to benefit your health. Vitamin D is not a regular vitamin, but a steroid hormone …
  • Ambulance Drones Could Help You Survive a Heart Attack November 17, 2014
    Heart disease is the #1 cause of death in the United States. The odds of surviving a heart attack outside of a hospital is only 8%. Four out of five heart attacks occur at home where there is no emergency …
  • Eugenics in America – In the Name of Science November 17, 2014
    Marilyn M. Singleton, M.D., J.D. presents at the AAPS 71st Annual Meeting, September 5, 2014, Charleston, South Carolina
  • Supreme Court to Examine Issue of Obamacare Subsidies November 14, 2014
    The Supreme Court will decide the fate of Obamacare yet again. This new case challenges the key issue of subsidies used to assist in purchasing insurance in the exchanges. This decision to hear the King v. Burwell case has surprised …
  • Apples to Protect Against Obesity November 12, 2014
    An apple a day may be as beneficial as daily statin use. Apples and pears reduce the risk of stroke by more than 50%. A new study has found that the bioactive compounds in apples not absorbed during digestion boost …
  • Diabetes Awareness: Testing & Treatment is Important November 10, 2014
    Diabetes mellitus, known commonly as diabetes, is a metabolic disease where a person has high blood glucose (sugar) because they do not produce enough insulin or the body’s cells do not respond properly to insulin. Glucose cannot enter our cells …
  • Tau Protein Causes Alzheimer’s, Not Plaque November 7, 2014
    A new study has discovered that the protein tau (the “tangles”) is the main cause of Alzheimer’s disease, not plaque as was previously believed. Tau determines how much amyloid protein stays in the cell and how much is secreted outside …
  • Direct Primary Care Reduces Healthcare Costs November 5, 2014
    Direct primary care benefits both the patient and the physician. Many people could afford medication if they could afford the office visit it stems from.  Clinics that take insurance have to hire extra people and invest in special technology in …
  • The Problem and Solution for Our Healthcare System November 3, 2014
    by Timothy D. Wingo, MD; Owner – Atlas Healthcare, PA It is obvious to everyone that the healthcare system in our country is broken and getting worse. What is not so obvious is what it would take to fix it. …
  • 3 Steps to Get Rid of Heartburn and GERD Forever October 31, 2014
    Heartburn and GERD are caused by too little stomach acid and bacterial overgrowth in the stomach and intestines. There are three steps to treat heartburn and GERD without drugs and keep them from returning. Reduce factors that promote bacterial overgrowth …
  • OMTEC 2014 – Keynote Interview with Industry Leaders (Installment 5 of 5) October 31, 2014
    Original, essential content from OMTEC. Industry leaders Michael Butler, Dirk Kuyper and Mike Matson discuss the intricacies of supplier relationships within the orthopaedic industry.
  • OMTEC 2014 – Keynote Interview with Industry Leaders (Installment 4 of 5) October 31, 2014
    Original, essential content from OMTEC. Industry leaders Michael Butler, Dirk Kuyper and Mike Matson discuss the intricacies of supplier relationships within the orthopaedic industry.
  • OMTEC 2014 – Keynote Interview with Industry Leaders (Installment 3 of 5) October 31, 2014
    Original, essential content from OMTEC. Industry leaders Michael Butler, Dirk Kuyper and Mike Matson discuss the intricacies of supplier relationships within the orthopaedic industry.
  • The Wasting of Taxpayer Money October 29, 2014
    by G. Keith Smith, MD If you are looking for proof of the fact that the wonderful folks in D.C. are more interested in lining the pockets of their pals than demonstrating good stewardship of the loot from the robbery …
  • Giving Birth in America is Most Expensive in the World October 27, 2014
    While a woman is preparing for giving birth, one worry she doesn’t want to have is about the cost of delivery. Insured women are finding that some policies do not cover maternity care, services that most often do not have …
  • Physicians are Not Medicine’s Top Earners October 24, 2014
    Physicians are the most highly trained members of the medical industry’s force, yet have median compensation.  The largest salaries go to the Medicrats who oversee the business of medicine. Insurance CEOs average $584,000 compared to surgeons ($306,000) or a general …
  • Health Benefits of Honey October 22, 2014
    Honey has been used as a natural sweetener long before sugar. Bees collect pollen from  plant to plant, which is passed along from bee to bee until it eventually is deposited into the honeycomb. They beat their wings to evaporate …
  • Rotten Food and the VA Hospital October 20, 2014
    by G. Keith Smith, MD Imagine for a moment that you own and operate a restaurant knowing that if you provide spoiled food and rotten service, you will subsequently make more money.  You openly employ strong-arm and intimidation tactics to …

Alieta Eck, M.D. On How Government Job Creation is Not Always a Good Thing

Government Job Creation Is Not Always a Good Thing

By: Alieta Eck, M.D.

When economist Milton Friedman observed mine workers in China digging a canal using shovels, he asked why they were not using modern machinery. He was told that this was a “jobs program” and that using shovels employed more workers. Friedman then quipped that they should give the workers spoons, not shovels. China had lost sight of the fact that the purpose of the work was to build a canal to increase commerce and enhance the lives of the citizens. Using machinery would lower the cost of the project and benefit the taxpayers.

When the government hires someone, the goal should be to provide for the common good and benefit those who are footing the bill. Value needs to be a primary consideration, as creating a job for the job’s sake only robs the taxpayer. Every dollar that is taxed or borrowed makes the taxpayer less free and less able to spend his own money on the needs of his own family. Taxes should be carefully spent.

With medical care, the first question must be, “Is providing medical care the proper role of government?” Then secondly, “If the government is going to provide a safety net for the poor, what is the most efficient way to do this?”

When Medicaid began in 1965, poor patients were given a card that entitled them to go to a doctor with the doctor sending the bill to the government. At first this seemed to work. The government paid the going rate—the rate the doctor needed to pay his staff and office overhead. This continued for about 20 years or so, until the law of unintended consequences overwhelmed the system.

Government money flowed. Medical costs went up, and the economy struggled. The government responded by ratcheting down the fees, and physicians dropped out. By 1990, the Medicaid payments were below the cost to provide the service, so patients on Medicaid had difficulty finding a physician.

Along came the idea of the Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs).

FQHCs are privately owned clinics that are non-profit. If they can prove they will be providing care in an underserved area, they are given $600,000 in federal dollars to start. This does not represent good value to the taxpayer. Key employees are well compensated and the board is often given extravagant expense accounts. Travel and “recruitment expenses” can reach hundreds of thousands of dollars without attracting notice.

FQHCs lobby for money from the federal and state governments, get “enhanced” Medicaid dollars, and have full medical malpractice coverage by the federal government. They see the poor, but also see people with insurance or who pay cash. They claim costs of $140-160 per patient visit, so constantly ask for more taxpayer dollars. Politicians, not wanting to appear callous toward the poor, comply.

State budgets are over-stretched, with Medicaid taking one-third, more than the cost of education. Today one in seven Americans is on Medicaid. And bureaucracy inflates the cost by a factor of ten.

It is time to recognize that government charity is too expensive, with minimal funds spent on actual care and a lot spent on paperwork, eligibility determination, fraud and abuse, and attempts to root out fraud and abuse. We could accomplish the same goal of caring for the poor while costing the taxpayer a lot less.

Why not provide protection to physicians who choose to volunteer their services to treat the poor in non-government free clinics? Patients who find themselves ill and poor would know that there is a clinic nearby, staffed by volunteers. The taxpayers would be relieved of having to pay billions in wasteful Medicaid dollars.

If the state covered the liability of such physicians, they would order fewer tests, and this in turn would lower wasteful expenditures, and thus perhaps lower everyone’s health insurance premiums.

Relieving the tax burden leaves more money to use for creating lasting, productive private jobs.

But we will have to convince our President, who thinks that extending unemployment benefits is a way to create jobs. The unemployed aren’t even digging with spoons. They aren’t digging at all!


Dr. Alieta Eck, MDgraduated from the Rutgers College of Pharmacy in NJ and the St. Louis School of Medicine in St. Louis, MO. She studied Internal Medicine at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in New Brunswick, NJ and has been in private practice with her husband, Dr. John Eck, MD in Piscataway, NJ since 1988. She has been involved in health care reform since residency and is convinced that the government is a poor provider of medical care. She testified before the Joint Economic Committee of the US Congress in 2004 about better ways to deliver health care in the United States. In 2003, she and her husband founded the Zarephath Health Center, a free clinic for the poor and uninsured that currently cares for 300-400 patients per month utilizing the donated services of volunteer physicians and nurses. Dr. Eck is a long time member of the Christian Medical Dental Association and in 2009 joined the board of the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons. In addition, she serves on the board of Christian Care Medi-Share, a faith based medical



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